Marvel’s Guardians of the Galaxy: The Telltale Series – Episode One: Tangled Up in Blue Review (Cubed3)

579950_20170524192200_1Developer: Telltale Games
Publisher: Telltale Games
Played on: PC
Release Date: April 18, 2017
Time Played (Steam): 3.4 hours
Played with: Mouse & Keyboard
Paid: $0 (Key provided for review)

Telltale Games cut their point-and-click teeth on comedy, with Sam & Max and Strong Bad’s Cool Game for Attractive People becoming early breakout hits. As time went on, though, they headed in a more drama-focused direction, with the most publicized catalyst being the first season of The Walking Dead. Its focus on life-changing decisions made under tight time constraints created an emotional rollercoaster of an experience, with a plethora of scenarios whose outcomes were a far cry from black and white.

With this pedigree behind it, Guardians of the Galaxy: Tangled Up in Blue feels like a huge step back. That’s not to say that it’s a wholly worthless experience, but it feels like a game that largely ignores the developments made by its predecessors.

Read the full review here [Cubed3]

The Games I Wish I Had Played in 2016

Well, it’s officially 2017 around the world.  The start of a new year.  Which means that everyone’s looking back on the last year and going, “Well that was a bit toss, wasn’t it?”  That is, except for the people who are taking the opportunity to look back at their fond memories from the year past, namely when it comes to video games.  There were countless fantastic games that got released last year, so many of which I desperately wanted to try out.  Unfortunately, as a university student, there are two things that I severely lack in: money and time.  As a result, it is incredibly common that I have to watch as new releases are hyped, released, and enjoyed by the masses, while waiting patiently for the day that they inevitably go on sale and I actually have the time to sit down with them.  Some of these games have been sitting in my library for months, awaiting their eventual installation.  Others are on my wishlist, hoping to one day be added to my ever-growing backlog.  Whatever the case, these are (in no particular order) the games that I wish I had gotten to in 2016.  You can also consider this to be a “To play in 2017” list, if that’s your thing.  Either way, you’ve probably all already played all of these and think I’m a pleb for not looking at them yet.

Okay.  😦 Continue reading

Something Something Christmas Post

soldiers-video-games-humor-christmas-artwork-killzone-3-wide.jpg

Copyright Guerrilla Games

‘Twas the night before Christmas, and all through the house,

Not a sound could be heard, ‘cept the click of a mouse.

I tapped softly at keys, poking them one by one,

In hopes that my Christmas post soon would be done.

Continue reading

Antenna Review

443580_20161209175205_1Developer: LWNA
Publisher: LWNA
Played on: PC
Release Date: April 7, 2016
Time Played (Steam): 16 minutes
Paid: $0 (Free to play)

Minimalism is a popular concept in video games.  One of the most commonly-used forms is in minimalistic art styles; many indie games in particular often opt for a clean, simple look to make their user interfaces and gameplay screens uncluttered and easy to understand.  However, minimalism can also be applied to other aspects of a game, such as the narrative or even the gameplay mechanics.  In some cases, this can lead to phenomenal results.  Take the various games that Telltale has made over the last few years; the player’s opportunities for interaction are typically limited to following button prompts, yet the rich narrative carries the experience.  Instead of picking and choosing, though, Antenna opts for minimalism in basically every aspect.  That’s not to say that it feels cheap or cobbled together; this is not some shovelware that was just thrown up on Steam Greenlight one day and left to die.  However, there’s also very little to grasp onto when it comes to doing a proper analysis of it. Continue reading

SOMA Review

282140_20160915182456_1.pngDeveloper: Frictional Games
Publisher: Frictional Games
Played on: PC
Release Date: September 22, 2015
Time Played (Steam): 11.1 hours
Paid: $15.94 (Multi-game bundle)

“Reality is that which, when you stop believing in it, doesn’t go away.”

-Philip K. Dick

It is with this quote that SOMA begins its interesting, insightful, and terrifying descent, both metaphorical and literal.  In its opening moments, the game establishes you as Simon Jarrett, a seemingly ordinary young man who is suffering from a severe head injury following a tragic car crash.  Given months to live, Simon decides to undergo an experimental procedure under the observation of Dr. David Munshi.  However, as the first stage of the procedure (a brain scan) begins, Simon is knocked out, and wakes up somewhere…else.  He eventually determines that he is onboard a largely abandoned facility known as PATHOS-II, and it’s some 100 years in the future.  After some exploring, Simon is able to contact one of the other sites on PATHOS-II, and reaches a woman named Catherine Chun.  She informs him of the purpose of the facility, and the two set out to complete the mission Catherine began before everything went to hell. Continue reading